Researchers Fid Distinctive Role Of Certain Histone Deacetylase In Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Researchers Fid Distinctive Role Of Certain Histone Deacetylase In Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

The survival rates for sufferers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have improved drastically over the last decade because of several new focused treatment alternatives for patients.

Researchers Fid Distinctive Role Of Certain Histone Deacetylase In Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Nonetheless, lung cancer remains the primary cause of cancer-related mortality, resulting in approximately 154,000 deaths annually in the USA. Many sufferers don’t respond to those new targeted therapies or they may develop drug immunity.

Scientists at Moffitt Cancer Center are trying to identify various strategies to deal with this illness. In a new article featured online in Scientific Reports, they highlight how targeting the histone deacetylase HDAC11 may be a novel therapeutic technique for NSCLC.

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are proteins that regulate the expression and activity of genes by changing DNA compaction and altering proteins. HDACs are often deregulated in different types of cancer, and several other drugs that inhibit HDACs have been approved to deal with these diseases. HDAC11 is one of the latest HDACs to be identified; however, its role in cancer is not yet recognized.

Moffitt researchers carried out a series of preclinical studies to review the role of HDAC11 in NSCLC. They found that prime levels of HDAC11 are found in samples from patients with NSCLC and that these high levels are related to poor survival. The research team wanted to delineate the potential role of HDAC11 in NSCLC development.

They focused their research on cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are slowly dividing cells that may undergo self-renewal. CSCs are recognized to contribute to tumor development and progression and are highly immune to chemotherapy and targeted drug therapies.